Eat. Eat some more.

Eat.  Share.
Eat some more.

Chinese New Year

(What's this?) Click on this "star" to bookmark your favourite food stories. To view the stories you have bookmarked, simply go to your account dashboard, and click on the "My Bookmarked Stories" link.
February 18, 2015 / Chinese / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Chinese New Year is the longest celebration in the Chinese calendar. It is also known as the Spring Festival. The Festival lasts from the last day of the last month, in the Chinese calendar, until the Lantern Festival, the 15th day of the first new year's month.

Time to honor Gods and ancestors, this traditional holiday is celebrated in countries with significant Chinese population.

The legend says that in the first day of the New Year a beast called the Nian would visit villages to eat crops, villagers and children. In order to protect themselves, villagers would cook and put food in front of their doors. The Nian would eat the food and it wouldn't attack people.

Each day of the celebration has its traditions. The first day is the most important one. Celebrating Gods and elders, lighting fireworks, burning bamboo sticks and firecrackers to banish the evil spirits.

The rest of the Spring Festival's days have different themes varying from celebrating Gods to eating only one type of food.

Now let's talk about our favorite thing. What type of food is enjoyed during this celebration?

The traditional meal is usually the New Year's Eve, dinner also known as Nian Ye Fan. Family members gather to celebrate the beginning of a New Year around a table full of delicious dishes. Pork, chicken and fish are the most common meat dishes. In some regions duck, Chinese sausage and seafood can be found on the New Year's Eve dinner table.

Traditionally there are served eight individual dishes. Eight symbolize good fortune and traditions are very important so usually we will see eight dishes served. There is one exception of this rule! If a member of the family died in the last year, at dinner there will be served only seven dishes.

 

New Year's Eve Menu

Eight dishes as we mentioned before, but not any kind of dishes, no, good luck dishes! Each country has its traditions when it comes to holidays. Chinese people love to serve "good luck food" at the New Year's Eve dinner.

Noodles

Noodles symbolize long life so noodle dishes are served at the New Year's Eve dinner

Miso-Glazed Scallops with Soba Noodles from Eating Well

Dumplings

They are the symbol of wealth so they should be present on the table!

Pork Dumplings from Steamy Kitchen

Whole Fish

Whole Fish is also a good luck food. In Chinese, "fish" sounds like "abundance" so this might be the reason why fish dishes are considered good luck food and why they are served on New Year's Eve.

Chinese Steamed Whole Fish from Food.com

 

Whole Chicken

Whole chicken represents family unity and family is very important for the Chinese population so this dish is another must for New Year's Eve dinner.

Chinese roast chicken from RasaMalaysia

 

Duck

Duck is the symbol of happiness and who doesn't want to be happy, right?

Authentic Chinese 5-Spice Peking Duck from Food.com 

Tea Eggs

We mentioned family is very important for Chinese people. Children make a family happier therefore the symbol of fertility is present on the table.

Tea Eggs from Use real Butter

 

Lobster

Starting the New Year with energy is something that shouldn't be ignored so let's incorporate the symbol of life and energy in the mix!

Cantonese-Style Ginger Scallion Lobster from The Woks of Life

 

Turnip Cake

Prosperity and rising fortunes have a very good taste in Chinese culture!

Chinese Turnip Cake Recipe from Jeanette’s Healthy Living


N/A

Country: China

Province/State: Anhui

City: N/A

Address: N/A

Zip/Post Code: N/A

Location Tips: N/A

Phone: N/A

Website:N/A

Price Guide:N/A (What's this?) N/A = home cooked meal,etc
$ = street food, fast food,etc
$$ = bistro, cafe, pub, bar,etc
$$$ = fine dining,etc

Comment
Related Stories

12 Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner Recip...

American / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Unexpected 7 Health Benefits Of Sesame O...

International / By
Adrian Cruce

51 Birthday Cake Recipes - The Ultimate ...

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Introduction To Vietnamese Cuisine - Mai...

Vietnamese / By
ETG - Food For Thought

AS SEEN ON

ABC Nine Com 6PR
Copyright © 2012-2017 Eat the Globe™ - All rights reserved

Related Stories

12 Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner Recip...

American / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Unexpected 7 Health Benefits Of Sesame O...

International / By
Adrian Cruce

51 Birthday Cake Recipes - The Ultimate ...

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Introduction To Vietnamese Cuisine - Mai...

Vietnamese / By
ETG - Food For Thought

AS SEEN ON

Copyright © 2012-2017 Eat the Globe™ - All rights reserved
Login to Eat The Globe
Username
Password
   Cancel
Close
Your profile is incomplete.
Simply complete your profile, it only takes 1 minute.
Button
Email this story to a friend
Close
Invalid Email format
Send Friend Request to this person
Close
Invalid Email format
Your Friend Request has been sent.