Eat. Eat some more.

Eat.  Share.
Eat some more.

Is Sugar Really That Bad For Us?

(What's this?) Click on this "star" to bookmark your favourite food stories. To view the stories you have bookmarked, simply go to your account dashboard, and click on the "My Bookmarked Stories" link.
August 13, 2014 / English / By
Nicola

By Fritzs (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

 

In general, the world is becoming a lot more health-focused. With advances in healthcare, medicine and technology, we are beginning to discover exactly what does - and doesn't - do us good. Recently, there has been increasing pressure on people to reduce their sugar intake, with the media bandying about words such as 'obesity', 'diabetes' and 'harmful'. How much of it is true, and how much of it is scaremongering? Is sugar really that bad for us?

Sugar is a natural ingredient which is thought to have been discovered over 5,000 years ago. Glucose (one form of sugar) is an important fuel for the body, so sugar is actually an essential part of our diet. At the moment it is advised that the average adult diet should contain about 50% carbohydrates, including sugars and starches.

All too often we are discouraged from drinking sugary drinks and eating sugary snacks like sweets and chocolate. In many people's mind-sets, 'healthy' snacks like fruit are much better for us. However, in actual fact, the body doesn't distinguish between naturally-occurring sugars, and those added during food and drink manufacture. To your body and mine, sugar is sugar.

There have been a lot of links made between sugar intake and the high levels of obesity. Action on Sugar, a campaign group made up of a number of specialists in this field, believe that there is definitely a link between obesity and calorie intake. According to them, much of the blame for this lies with sugar intake.

However, there has been some criticism of this. In 2013 the World Health Organisation funded a review of the link between sugar and obesity. Following this, Sugar Nutrition UK stated that 'any link to body weight was due to overconsumption of calories and was not specific to sugars'. Furthermore, statistics from Government Family Food show that there has actually been a decrease in total sugar consumption in the UK over the last decade, by almost 12%. This flies in the face of any claims that increased sugar consumption directly leads to increasing obesity numbers.

It is true that sugar plays an important part in the lives of people living with diabetes. The pancreas produces insulin, which controls how much glucose is in the blood. For people with diabetes, not enough insulin is produced, meaning that their blood sugar levels rise too high. There have been reports and speculation, by both the media and the public, that diabetes is caused by a high intake of sugar, but is it true?

A link has been made between obesity and diabetes - that much is true. Those who are overweight are much more likely to develop diabetes than those who are not. A review published in the EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) Journal actually found that there was insufficient evidence that there was a direct link between consuming lots of sugar and developing an obesity-related condition such as diabetes.

What can we deduct from all of this? The debate on whether or not sugar is bad for us has been going on for decades, and it's likely that it will continue to do so! There have been and always will be reports giving evidence for both sides of the argument. As much as sugar probably isn't the best for us in large quantities, it is something that the body actually needs, and the evidence suggests that it doesn't directly lead to all these problems, like the media would have us believe. As stated at the beginning, people have been consuming sugar for thousands of years, and it is an important ingredient in our diets. It's all about everything in moderation - the same applies for all different food groups and ingredients. Yes, too much can cause some problems, but some sugar here and there is neither something to be afraid of nor avoided.

N/A

Country: United Kingdom

Province/State: Wiltshire

City: N/A

Address: N/A

Zip/Post Code: N/A

Location Tips: N/A

Phone: N/A

Website:N/A

Price Guide:N/A (What's this?) N/A = home cooked meal,etc
$ = street food, fast food,etc
$$ = bistro, cafe, pub, bar,etc
$$$ = fine dining,etc

Comment
Related Stories

Spain's Top 13 Most Delicious Dishes

Spanish / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Cauliflower Health Benefits And Recipes

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Introduction To Moroccan Cuisine - Main ...

Moroccan / By
ETG - Food For Thought

51 Cheesecake Recipes - The Ultimate Che...

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

AS SEEN ON

ABC Nine Com 6PR
Copyright © 2012-2017 Eat the Globe™ - All rights reserved

Related Stories

Spain's Top 13 Most Delicious Dishes

Spanish / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Cauliflower Health Benefits And Recipes

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

Introduction To Moroccan Cuisine - Main ...

Moroccan / By
ETG - Food For Thought

51 Cheesecake Recipes - The Ultimate Che...

International / By
ETG - Food For Thought

AS SEEN ON

Copyright © 2012-2017 Eat the Globe™ - All rights reserved
Login to Eat The Globe
Username
Password
   Cancel
Close
Your profile is incomplete.
Simply complete your profile, it only takes 1 minute.
Button
Email this story to a friend
Close
Invalid Email format
Send Friend Request to this person
Close
Invalid Email format
Your Friend Request has been sent.