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Typical Hungarian: Paprikas Csirkes (Chicken Paprikash) Recipe

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May 2, 2013 / Hungarian / By
Emily Jaworski

This being my first post, I figured it's best to start out at home.  Well, maybe I should write "home" with the quotes.  I have been living in Budapest, Hungary for three and a half years now after coming here to study and basically never leaving.

Budapest is a wonderful city, so full of life, especially in the spring and summer.  There are countless terraces, patios, and gardens (kerts in Hungarian) to spend a leisurely afternoon or lively evening.

While in general Hungarian food isn't my favorite, there are a few dishes that have become staples in my recipe rotation.

I learnt to make this recipe from several different Hungarian friends, so it is a bit of a hodge podge in styles.  Let's call this rendition of it from Anna, as hers was the greatest influence. 

This dish is typical Hungarian, made with the staple spice of paprika.  Paprika itself comes in many different forms, sweet, spicy, and smoked.  They are each wonderful in their own way, and can certainly be used for this dish, although the sweet one is the traditional. 

Hungarians also love their meat, so chicken here is the centerpiece.  Flour dumplings, galuska (in Hungarian, the letter 's' makes the 'sh' sound) are also served with this dish, making it very filling.  It's not spicy at all, a common misconception about dishes made with paprika.  You can also add some tomatoes, hungarian green peppers, or scallions for garnishes, but these are not the original way.

Pictured below with a rose froccs (pronounced like 'fritch'), which is basically a wine spritzer with rose wine.  Very Hungarian and very summer appropriate.

So, without further ado, I give you Paprikas Csirkes with Galuska (Chicken Paprikash with dumplings).

 

Paprikas Csirkes with Galuska

Chicken + Sauce Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken quarters with the skin on, washed
  • 7 large onions, diced thin
  • 3 to 4 cups of water, depending on evaporation
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons sweet (csemege) Hungarian paprika
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream or sour cream, for garnish
  • 1/4 cup cooking oil (canola, sunflower, olive oil all work)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Galuska Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 teaspoons of salt (less if you are not a fan)

Steps:

  1. In a large wok or dutch oven, saute the onions in the oil for about 10 minutes, until they are translucent.  Take care not to burn them or let them brown.
  2. Add in 3 tablespoons of the paprika to the onion mixture.  Stir constantly for another 2 minutes, taking care that the paprika doesn't burn or stick to the pan.
  3. Add in the water, bring to a boil.  Let this sauce simmer then for up to one hour uncovered.  This will really bring out the onion and paprika flavors.
  4. Add in the chicken pieces whole, making sure to move the liquid around to cover the chicken.  Periodically move the chicken around in the liquid to make sure that it is cooking all over. If you have a cover, use it. 
  5. Add in the remaining paprika, and additional water if the mixture is getting dry.  
  6. Chicken should cook for about 45 minutes to one hour.  Use a meat thermometer to check its preparedness.
  7. When the chicken has about 20 minutes left to cook, begin to prepare the galuska (dumplings, see recipe below).
  8. Once everything is ready, on each plate, place a piece of chicken and some galuska.  Pour the sauce from the chicken all over the top.  Garnish on top with a drizzle of heavy cream or sour cream (more traditional).

 

Galuska:

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  2. Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl.
  3. Add in the two eggs, one at a time, mixing everything completely.  The mixture should be sticky and resemble a dough with a slight yellow color. If too sticky, add a little water to thin it out.
  4. Once the water is boiling, add in a few drops of oil or butter.
  5. To make the galuska, take a spoon and dip it first into the hot water.  Then, dip it into the flour mixture, taking a piece of dough out, about the size of half a thumb.
  6. Add the dough to the water, and repeat the process.  Once the galuskas are floating at the top (about 3-4 mins) they are cooked and can be scooped out to drain in a colander.

N/A

Country: Hungary

Province/State: Budapest

City: Budapest

Address: N/A

Zip/Post Code: N/A

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Price Guide:N/A (What's this?) N/A = home cooked meal,etc
$ = street food, fast food,etc
$$ = bistro, cafe, pub, bar,etc
$$$ = fine dining,etc

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